San Carlos

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Contact Agility Health for Advanced Home Care in San Carlos, Caregiver in San Carlos, Elder Care in San Carlos, End Of Life Care in San Carlos, Home Care in San Carlos, Home Health Aide in San Carlos, Home Health Care in San Carlos, Hospice in San Carlos, Hospice Care in San Carlos, In Home Care in San Carlos, Occupational Therapist in San Carlos, Occupational Therapy in San Carlos, Physical Therapy in San Carlos, Private Nurse in San Carlos, Registered Nurse in San Carlos, Respite Care in San Carlos, Senior Helpers in San Carlos, Senior Home Care in San Carlos, Social Services in San Carlos, Speech Therapy in San Carlos, and in surrounding areas.

Below is some general information about San Carlos:

San Carlos is a city in San Mateo County, California, USA on the San Francisco Peninsula, about halfway between San Francisco and San Jose. It is an affluent small residential suburb located between Belmont to the north and Redwood City to the south. San Carlos’ ZIP code is 94070, and it is within the 650 area code. The population was 28,406 at the 2010 census. San Carlos, “The City of Good Living”, aims for a “small town” feel. Its main downtown area is composed mostly of small shops and restaurants. San Carlos was the first city in California to open a charter school, and its schools rank consistently well in state-wide lists. San Carlos is home to San Carlos Airport and two museums. Located downtown, the San Carlos History Museum is dedicated to the display of the history of the town from early native American history to the space age. This museum is open every Saturday from 1pm to 4pm. The Hiller Aviation Museum, a museum specializing in helicopter and aviation history, offers interactive exhibits and more than forty aircraft including a replica of the first aircraft to fly, a spy drone with a 200-foot wingspan, and the nose section of a Boeing 747. Transportation options include membership in the SamTrans bus system and a Caltrain station. The administrative headquarters of both agencies are located at 1250 San Carlos Avenue. As of 2003, the city began experimenting with a free shuttle bus service named S.C.O.O.T to help with transportation difficulties for those living in the hills of the town, and especially to make up for a lack of school buses. However, voters rejected a parcel tax which placed 100% of the financial burden on property owners and the S.C.O.O.T program was dismantled on June 17, 2005.

City Hall was once located at 666 Elm Street. The address number was later changed to 600 Elm Street due to pressure from residents. San Carlos was also once home of the Circle Star Theater where performers such as Richard Marx and Richard Pryor performed. It was torn down and replaced by office buildings. San Carlos also once boasted the 2,500 student San Carlos High School which was closed in 1982 due to declining enrollment. Today, students travel to Belmont’s Carlmont High School or Redwood City’s Sequoia High School to receive their public secondary education. Every May, the town hosts the Hometown Days carnival in Burton Park, the city’s largest park. In October, the Chamber of Commerce hosts the San Carlos “Art & Wine Festival”. Thursday evenings during the summer Laurel street is home to a weekly farmer’s market known as “Hot Harvest Nights.” However, most people call it “Farmer’s Market”.

Prior to the Spanish arrival in 1769, the land of San Carlos was occupied by a group of Native Americans who called themselves the Lamchins. While they considered themselves to have a separate identity from other local tribes, modern scholars consider them to be a part of the Ohlone or Costanoan tribes that inhabited the Bay Area. The Lamchins referred to the area of their primary residence – probably on the north bank of Pulgas creek – as “Cachanihtac”, which included their word for vermin. When the Spanish arrived, they translated this as “the fleas”, or “las Pulgas”, giving many places and roads their modern names. The Native American life was one of traditional hunting and gathering. There was plentiful game and fowl available, and fish could be caught in the San Francisco Bay. There were also grasses, plants and oak trees, and archaeological finds of mortars and pestles indicate that these source were processed for food. No doubt they also participated in the regional trading networks for goods that could not be gathered or grown locally. The Lamchin permanent village is thought to have been between the modern streets of Alameda de las Pulgas and Cordilleras Avenue, near San Carlos Avenue. In 1769, Gaspar de Portolˆ was the first westerner to reach the San Francisco Bay. While early historians placed his approach to the Bay from the Pacific Ocean as coming over the San Carlos hills, present researchers believe this “discovery” actually occurred in present day Belmont. The Spanish, with overwhelming military and economic advantages over the native population, quickly dominated the Bay Area. A mission was established in San Francisco, and land was deeded in large “ranchos”, or ranches, to prominent and wealthy Spaniards, with no concern for the native populations that lived on them. The new ranch owners raised cattle on the lands, displacing the native game populations and disrupting the food supply of the indigenous population. As well, the Spanish strongly discouraged the Native Americans from their periodic controlled burns, which helped maintain the grasslands. Facing the end of their way of life, the local population had little choice but to seek assistance from the missions and convert to Christianity. Traditional trade routes and alliances fell apart by 1800. While the missions continued to receive converts throughout the first half of the 19th century, the Native American way of life in the Bay Area was all but destroyed by that time. The land now occupied by the city of San Carlos was deeded as a single large rancho to Don JosŽ Dar’o ArgŸello. He and his family did not live there, but rather raised cattle and crops for money on “Rancho Cachinetac”. JosŽ’s son Luis ArgŸello was the first California-born governor of the state, and after his death in 1830 the remaining family moved to the ranch, now known as Rancho de las Pulgas. The family adobe was located at the present-day intersection of Magnolia and Cedar streets.

In 1944, Dalmo Victor established the city’s first large electronics plant, followed soon after by Eitel McCullough, Varian Associates, and GTE Lenkurt. Establishment of these two firms was a factor in the quadrupling of San Carlos population in the decade after 1940. In 1950, when the population was 14,371, the city boasted a total of 89 industries: wholesalers, manufacturers and distributors, producing a variety of commodities from electronics to cosmetic. By 1958, the electronic industry comprised a substantial segment of the city’s industrial area. In the late 1940s when Bayshore was a two-lane road, the San Carlos Airport was moved from its former location between Brittan and San Carlos Avenues to its present site. The airport was bought by the county from Cal West Yacht Harbor in 1964 for $990,000.

In the state legislature, San Carlos is in the 13th Senate district, represented by Democrat Jerry Hill, and in the 22nd Assembly district, represented by Democrat Kevin Mullin. Federally, San Carlos is in California’s 14th congressional district, represented by Democrat Jackie Speier. Brad Lewis, a producer of films including Ratatouille, served as mayor in 2008. The current mayor of San Carlos is Mark Olbert. City Council members include Bob Grassilli, Ron Collins, Cameron Johnson, and Matt Grocott. The public schools in San Carlos are run by the San Carlos School District, although the school district boundaries do not cover the entire city of San Carlos. There are several elementary schools and a few middle schools, nearest public high school in the neighboring city of Belmont since the 1982 closure of San Carlos High School. In 1996, Vice President Al Gore came to speak at Arundel Elementary School in regards to Net Day ’96, and former President Bill Clinton came to Charter Learning Center in 1997.

Source: San Carlos on Wikipedia

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